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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
we set out to do. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [applause] because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. the core of al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan is on the way to defeat. >> president obama with the marines this week. osama bin laden is gone, but his number two man is still around, and so is his personal assistant, who has planned an attack on american targets, leading to the closing of 19 embassies and the state department has ordered nonessential staff to leave the u.s. consulate and issued a travel warning. colby, the game is not over. >> the game is not over and it raises questions about the information that led to the decision and how we got it. it goes back to the mega-data that has been gathered. does it suggest there is value in what they have done? the activity that we have been reading about -- there is fruit from it that allows them to take the action they have taken? the threat has not gone away. >> how about this -- we do not want another benghazi? is that the message? >> it is clear part of the motivation was because of benghazi, the
. al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> it may be a new al qaeda, a more splintered al qaeda, but they don't, certainly, when you look at the most broad response in american history, you're closing 21 embassies, certainly don't seem to be on the run. >> i think we've got to be on the alert for this. yes, we did take out osama bin laden. and as soon as the next chief pops up we take him out in the central node of al qaeda. it's still dangerous. and it can transform itself. you've got people who spend their lives plotting how to hurt americans. so until every one of those people is eliminated or they change their motivations, we've got a continuing issue. i think what the president was trying to say was the central nervous system of the old al qaeda has been broken and broken down and decapitated with getting rid of osama bin laden. and that's a good thing, but it's not the end of it. >> thanks to each of you. >>> as many of you know, we have devoted much of our program over the past year to the benghazi attacks and their afteras a matter of fact. please join us on tuesda
the country's capacity for self inflicted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and points out there is always a nightmare of acquiring use -- terrorists acquiring and using these weapons of mass destruction that nothing would give them greater satisfaction that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it, since 9/11, the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries , has remained, frankly, open and free. we continued to have super bowl's and people travel abroad and robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use the analogy of it is like a hurricane. forecasting weather a potential storm and we're battening down the hatches and a few limited places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward and a way i think is professionally responsible and they are being advised not just by political advisers but also the cia -- one of my old agenci
office? osama bin laden was caught on tape saying he wanted to bleed america to the point of bankruptcy. -- -- if 250,000 people take that us and because of some poison in washington dc, it is our own overreaction that a self-destructing. security, a total budget of $40 billion, a lot of things combined into one -- we're not talking about that large amount of money. picture, -- you said, be aware of the bodies. if we hadn't stopped the time square plot, the london , there are three or fourth -- 3000 or 4000 people right there. there are any number of others that have been stopped. i wish the rest of the country would use the nypd as a model. there is so much done as far as cooperation between the government and suppliers and distributors and merchants so if somebody goes to buy explosives, devices,buys certain that is taken to the nypd and they can follow up on it. i would just say 3000 bodies is terrible, but that is 3000wide, when every year die in house fires in america. if there was a successful dirty bomb attack, it could neutralize an entire city. one dirty bomb going off in downt
is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> reporter: the white house aide said the cia director and other officials noted al qaeda affiliates were gaining steam. >> did he give the full picture to the people in the campaign about the threat of al qaeda, when that was his talking about again and again? >> it is indisputable the elimination of osama bin laden was a major accomplishment in the effort against al qaeda. we have been clear and the president has been clear that the threat from al qaeda very much remains. >> reporter: republicans know al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is its deadliest affiliate of all. >> al qaeda is in many ways stronger than 9/11, because it mutated and spread and come at us different directions. >> reporter: tense times in the mid east, where the u.s. is having talks in egypt with a jailed senior leader of muslim brotherhood, amid fears the government is losing control of key cities. >> that will allow the sinai to become as you said wild west of terrorism where groups like al qaeda and hamas can coordinate and plot attacks. >> reporter: as the egyptian govern
that they be questioned and placed in custody of u.s. officials without delay. osama bin laden had been criminally charged long before the september 11, 2001 terrorist attacks but was not apprehended. delays in apprehending the suspected benghazi killers will only put american lives at further and needless risk, closed quote. ab? >> i think that's true. it is one thing after the embarrassment of cnn hunting down the top suspect named by the fbi that the fbi couldn't locate. it is not surprising that they would come up with some form of charging, but charging is different from detaining this person or the several others under this sealed criminal indictment. i also think it is not surprising that september 11th is coming up and they were going to come up with something like this pretty soon, so between the cnn report and the year anniversary, something was going to happen, conveniently it is congressional recess. i think you'll see more revelations and developments coming out from the administration and what's interesting about the politics of this is that there is not a mood on capitol hill for moving to
and communication security of osama bin laden is, he would not be online in direct communication. he shows up at various points. there is a suggestion that he was indeed in the conversation. people have asked us, why would you report all these details? our sources have made it clear that when the leader who reported the communications -- it was enough information for al qaeda to walk back the cat. we left out some details from our initial report. believe,oint, we especially since our sources were giving us this information, that it was important to explain the current context of threats. point, i think it is a tough one. cannot argue with the fact that u.s. special operations forces in 2011 found osama bin laden and killed him. that was a huge blow to the organization. that, years leading up to a lot of analysts believe that bin laden was out of touch. they figured he did not play a day-to-day role. the organization has devolved into affiliates. one of the stories i remember writing after the raid -- bin laden played an important role in terms of managing this organization with these various
al qaeda, we decimated the top leadership and we killed osama bin laden and the main number two or number three leaders. i don't think anything he said was inaccurate. the reality is al qaeda has been reconstituted in different satellite organizations across the region. so we have al qaeda in libya, for example. al qaeda in the sudan, for example. so it's not just the old al qaeda in afghanistan or iraq. al qaeda is taking different forms and shapes and that's the reality that the state department -- >> repeat my question. he said we decimated al qaeda, okay? he said they were not the threat that they once were, however you wish to paraphrase it. our clips were pretty specific. have they now, thankfully, changed their position about the al qaeda threat? is that what you hear about this announcement? >> no. this is an administration that's been ever vigilant in fighting the threat since they came in office. they were focused about getting osama bin laden from the beginning and they've been executing drone strikes at a rate faster than the bush administration and by the way, that'
al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. now an unprecedented closure and a travel alert which lasts for a month. the state department hates to do that the. the travel advisory they do. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they are objecting to the ambassadors there cabling back to the state department saying, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? to issue a travel alert for the next month means the threat is serious. >> senator demint the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair to criticize him for doing too much? >> it's clear al qaeda may be more of a threat to us than they were before 9/11. as you have heard from the experts on both sides he aisle in congress, there is a very real threat there. i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true. our attempt to placate parts of the world, reset whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working. the perception of weakness in the administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> juan, wh
-qaeda is on the run, osama bin laden is dead, and now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. the travel alert, which lasts for a month, which incidentally, i'm not sure people understand, the state department hates to do that. this is the highest level -- the travel advisories they do routinely. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they're objecting to the ambassadors there. the ambassadors are cabling back to the state department, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? for the u.s. government, the state department to issue a travel alert for the next month means about the threat is serious. >> chris: senator demint, the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair now to criticize him for doing too much? >> well, it's clear that al-qaeda may be more of a threat to us they were before 9/11 now. we don't know exactly what all the intelligence is, but as you've heard from a lot of the experts on both sides the aisle in congress, there's a real threat there. so i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think w
is in afghanistan, alongside osama bin laden and kaurted and went back to prison and escaped from prison. >> what is going on with these prison breaks? >> it's scary. >> this was while ago but we had someone the last couple of weeks as well. >> the last couple of weeks very dramatic prison breaks. over a thousand taliban prisoners were able to escape in the hinterlands. a couple of days ago 4,000 prisoners walked out of leppo prisoner after islamic state of iraq launched an attack on that prison. we have seen prison breaks in iraq and abu ghraib and elsewhere. some of them gotten out we never will see again but unfortunately we will see some again and we will find out they are as dedicated what they were sent there to begin with. >> general, what do we need to do? what is the strategy moving forward? because when it comes to the middle east, obviously, we are getting out of iraq and afghanistan. we are helping some of the rebels some syria. seems like we are relying on drones to go after so many targets now. what is the strategy moving forward? >> i think we have probably done about as well as we
to hear from the perpetrator himself. other than the occasional video from osama bin laden and the like, often those who commit horrific acts are kept from the lime light and disappear forever, like the aurora shooter or the boston marathon bomber. but today we all got a long, hard look at evil. we heard man, ariel castro, who pleaded guilty to unspeakable crimes to three young girls and their children. he tried to apologize, federal budget after -- even after he l distinct impression he didn't do anything that wrong. >> i have an addiction, just like an alcoholic has an addiction. alcoholics cannot control their addiction. that's why i couldn't control my addiction, your honor. these accusations that i would come home and beat her, beat them, those are totally wrong, your honor. because, like i said before, i am not a violent person. i'm not a violent person. i simply kept them there without allowing them to leave. >> it reminded some of us of that famous phrase, the benality of evil. and while what castro said today was infuriating and what he it was incomprehensible, you might not th
qaeda is on its heels and osama bin laden is dead. >> reporter: republicans say telling the truth about benghazi might have undermined a case for re-election. >> the american people are owed an apology for the misinformation that went on for weeks. >> reporter: the white house chafes at any suggestion of a coverup. >> the fact that this keeps on getting churned out, frankly has a lot to do with political motivations. >> reporter: there is no disputing this, the explanations have, at times, been inconsistent, conflicting and inaccurate. >> what we do know is that the natural protests that was the outrage over the video was used as an excuse by extremists. >> i heard hillary clinton say it was an act of terrorism. what do you say? >> we're still doing an investigation. there's no doubt that the kind of weapons that were used, the ongoing assault that it wasn't just a mob action. >> reporter: exhibit a in this debate is these benghazi talking points used by ambassador rice when she made the sunday show rounds. >> the whole issue of talking points, frankly throughout this process, has been
back when the hunt for osama bin laden was still raging, some intelligence forces believed al qaeda was even developing its own intranet that was electronically hidden behind jihadi websites and accessible to only a few people. whether they succeeded or such a system still exists like much of the communication structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. "outfront" next why dr. sanjay gupta change ed his mind on weed. an about-face and he h eel explain why. >>> then are you driving a compact car that failed a crash test? we have the alarming results. >>> and a double play. he made the catch but what he did next was the true score. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of
: a few years back when the hunt for osama bin laden was still raging, some intelligence forces believed al qaeda was even developing its own intranet that was electronically hidden behind jihadi websites and accessible to only a few people. whether they succeeded or such a system still exists like much of the communication structure remains shrouded in mystery. tom foreman, washington. >> of course the great irony using so much american innovation to try to destroy america. >>> our tourt fourth story outfront, dr. sanjay gupta changes his mind on weed. 20 states allow medical marijuana. and the medical community seems to be changing its mind on pot. but you know, not everybody is. a lot are adamantly against it. but there is a dramatic turn around for dr. gupta who just four years ago wrote an article for "time" magazine titled why i would vote no for pot. the ground breaking new documentary airing this sunday on cnn. and in it, he explained why he changed his mind. sanjay, the fda says marijuana is harmful, we know that. michael bloomberg is quoted saying medical marijuana is the great
. >> al qaeda has been decimated. >> osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for re-election last year we heard him talk about the decimation of al qaeda. but here's what the president said in his press conference on friday. >> core al qaeda is on its heels, has been decimated. but what i also said was that al qaeda and other extremists have metastasized into regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week the state department closed 19 american outposts in the mideast and africa, and they evacuated the u.s. embassy in yemen. this week they warned americans not to travel to pakistan and they evacuated non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burnson say decorated former cia officer who served as station chief on three separate occasions and led several of the agency's most important counterterrorism deployments. he spent his career hunting down al qaeda. he's also the author of a book, awbreaker: the attack on bin laden and al qaeda." gary joins me now. i appreciate you being with me. w
osama bin laden was in pakistan, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him -- because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense university in may and basically said ok, now we are returning back to the pre-9/11 days. we are not at war anymore. we are going back to pre-9/11. we will go try to round up the guys when they blow up. we are no longer on a war footing, if you will, in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that is dead wrong. it is an absolute total misreading of where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world, north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from, but also yemen and the major struggle underway in egypt, the muslim brotherhood taken power there, the group having spawned all those other radical groups,
about the intelligence community tracking of osama bin laden. the raid it says was guided by a group of satellites in space which pointed dozens of separate receivers of pakistan to collect a vast amount of data as the mission took place. it noticed the united states watches allies and enemies. counter intelligence operations are strategically focused against targets of china, russia, iran, cuba and israel. >> i don't think that would surprise anybody who we are collecting against and also what we think our major concerns are in the world. it makes sense to have that in the budget. it would be better for it nout to be out in the public domain. >> reporter: north korea says what are described as five critical gaps in u.s. intelligence about nuclear and missile programs and analysts knowing almost nothing about the intentions of new leader, kim jong-un. interesting that it was revealed in a story leaked by former contract employee, snowden, one of their own. >> much more on this with the panel. >>> a disturbing look at the fort hood shooter before his attack. >>> here is what our fox a
. >>> al qaeda's on the path to defeat, and bin laden is dead. >> al qaeda has been decimated. >> osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for re-election last year we heard him talk about the decimation of al qaeda. but here's what the president said in his press conference on friday. >> core al qaeda is on its heels, has been decimated. but what i also said was that al qaeda and other extremists have metastasized into regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week the state department closed 19 american outposts in the mideast and africa, and they evacuated the u.s. embassy in yemen. this week they warned americans not to travel to pakistan and they evacuated non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burnson say decorated former cia officer who served as station chief on three separate occasions and led several of the agency's most important counterterrorism deployments. he spent his career hunting down al qaeda. he's also the author of a book, "jawbreaker: the attack on bin laden and a
for osama bin laden. miss potress is still working on the third installment in that trilogy which is about u.s. surveillance of phone calls
. the second part tells the story of two men from yemen including one who was a driver for osama bin laden. miss potress is still working on the third installment in that trilogy which is about u.s. surveillance of phone calls and e-mails and so on since 9/11. she posted a bit of that one last year on "the new york times" website. >> build social networks for everybody. that turns into the graph then you index all that data to that graph which means you can pull out a community, that that gives you an outline of the life of everybody in the community. and if you carry it over time from 2001 up, you have that ten years worth of their life that you can lay out in a timeline that involves anybody in the country. even senators and house of representatives. all of them. the dangers here are that we fall into something like a totalitarian state like east germany. >> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitress, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for he
of two men from yemen including one who was a driver for osama bin laden. miss poitras is still working on the third installment in that trilogy which is about u.s. surveillance of phone calls and e-mails and so on since 9/11. she posted a bit of that one last year on "the new york
libya, and putting the special forces into pakistan to get to osama bin laden, those were cases where the president wanted to be careful and get to a specific end game. here, i think we're not looking for an open-ended military conflict. but the military strategy is probably on the president's desk. that the joint chiefs are probably looking at right now. i've been in some of the rooms where the military options have been discussed. the number one reason, to degrade his capabilities, to deter him from doing this again. we have lost some of it, it is to hold at risk something that assad values. so if we can put in our sight those things we values, the military command in control, the military headquarters, the rocket-firing capabilities, and some of his air offensive, that can be accomplished. >> can that be accomplished with military strikes? >> it can be accomplished, we just put on station a fifth guided missile destroyer, the uss stout came to the eastern area today. we'll have enough fire power, while we would love to have allies like the brits, we don't need them for fire power,
but the country's capacity for self-inflself-infl icted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and he points out there is always a nightmare for example of acquiring, terrorists acquiring weapons of mass distraction but nothing would give the terrorists and a greater satisfaction than we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict their lives and liberties accordingly. >> guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it since 9/11 the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries has remained frankly open and free. we have continued to have super bowls and have continued to have people travel abroad. we have robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action i would use the analogy is like a hurricane. we have weather forecast that says there is going to be a storm and we are battening down the hatches and if you live in these places as the storm passes , great but this administration is leaning forward in a way that i think is professionally responsible and they are being advise
report on the way. al-jazeera known for receiving and broadcasting osama bin laden's video messages, now it's getting ready to launch a news network here in the u.s. our news watch panel weighs in on those prospects next. pu jon: amid all the controversy over the roll out of obamacare the president going on offensive, blasting the republicans who are critical of his signature piece of legislation. he is charging gop lawmakers never offered health care plans never offered health care plans jim angle is live in washington with a fact check. >> reporter: president obama says republicans are trying to roll out obamacare without, he says, alternatives. >> they used to say they will replace it with something better. there is not even pretense they will replace it with something better. >> for the president to say that the no member of congress hat not put up solution to health care analysis is not true. >> reporter: dr. pryce has his own plan that was passed before obamacare and his isn't the only one. >> the president has incredibly short memory. he seems to have forgotten his campaign spent
and when we killed osama bin laden. > right. there is the 10th anniversary of september 11. and killing osama bin laden. this is pretty unusual, this but embassies>> are closed quietly and have been for the past couple of days quietly. this is just politics what they have done him a to convince the american public that they are on top of things. quite frankly, it is had a painful effect for our allies and not made us look very good worldwide. >> we have time for a couple of questions. >> is the microphone working? just elevate my voice. i apologize. that is better, ok. there is an article in national review a few weeks ago by a commentator who had done an economic analysis of these issues, which i thought was interesting. a slightly different perspective. his observation was that the of a life saved is about $20 million. if you compare the cost of our tower -- our counterterrorism establishment, comes up about $20 million per american life saved in these efforts. and that the nsa's program, by his calculation, was costing in the range of around $100 million per life saved. his point, ap
the global jihad foundation, obviously, shift more when osama bin laden took over and 9/11, but are we seeing now both disciples came together and sort of shared the same ideology? zawahiri, have we seen the shift towards a new approach to globallied had, or are we going to see -- global jihad? are we going to see more of cybersecurity issues, cyber wars that he's going to try and develop in al-qaeda, and now is it going to affect u.s. policy. >> want me? >> do you want to? >> yale, i'll go. we've -- yeah, i'll go. i think the big analytical mistake is to think that's not part of their global designs or doesn't assist them in waging global jihad. case in point in yemen, instituted a political platform under ansar al-sharia. and basically, this was there attempt to say that we can provide governance and basic services to you and that we can start, basically, you know, adopting parts of sort of, you know, the hezbollah or hamas model, we're going to ingrain ourselves in the committee and build up our own sort of governing model. the associated press recently came out with the head of the al-qae
generally worked against al qaeda, osama bin laden being the most prominent example. other members of core al qaeda. and al qaeda-affiliated elements. >> there were three associated forces when you're in office. >> those were the three that i had the occasion to evaluate most often. here were other instances when i would conduct a legal evaluation where we did not go forward with a specific operation, but those are the three most prominent examples that we regularly briefed to congress. you referred to my oxford speech. i think we are at an inflection point as one journalist put it where we should no longer consider ourselves in a traditional armed conflict against al qaeda and affiliated groups. i think benghazi is a prominent example of what i am talking about. you cannot label the benghazi attacked as something conducted by al qaeda and associated forces. it was more of a mixed bag. in this period where we're head in addition new direction, we need to evaluate in congress what new authorities our counterterrorism professionals might need. and we're not just talking about drone strikes.
overreact -- i mean, osama bin laden was caught on tape saying he wanted to bleed america to the point of bankruptcy. and if 250,000 people take ciprol because there are tiny envelopes in washington, d.c., this is our own overreaction. it's self-destructive. >> homeland security and, again, i think the total budget's about $40 billion. if it had not been combined, maybe it would have been 32, 33 billion. so we're not talking about that large amount of money. in the overall picture, it has not been that draining. also you said where are bodies? well, if we hadn't stopped the london explosive plot, if we hadn't stopped the times square, the new york subway bombing, the -- actually, we got lucky in the michigan one, there's three or four thousand people right there, that's just three attacks i'm talking about, and there are any number of others that have been stopped. and again, i just wish the rest of the country used the nypd as the model because there's so much cooperation. if somebody does go to buy certain types of explosives, certain devices, that is told the nypd, and they can foll
what i'm going to ask you for a one-word answer. do you believe that osama bin laden for five years in abbottabad pakistan without anyone in the pakistani military intelligence knowing about it? >> no, don't believe it. >> i'm going to ask you for a 10 word answer. [laughter] >> this is my opinion. i don't think general kayani newdow. i don't think the leadership confab don't think there is think there was a plan of what he was that this was 700 meters from the gates of west point. who knows what 700 meters are from the gates of west point but the reality is it was a distinct compound. it was like the fun house at the end of the street where people didn't at the same as everybody else in the neighborhood in an area where people are not actually trusting so somebody facilitated something. i buy into the idea that the ambassador and i were talking about. it probably was not official but someone who has a relationship with an official who is providing help. there is a delegate to ask questions that need to be asked. there's a failure of due diligence. >> sometimes if you read new was s
they were funded, where the training camps were. on 9/11 we did not know that. we knew osama bin laden was back, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him --because he was ejected more than anybody else -- to enhanced integration techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense and basicallymay said ok, now we are returning back to the tree-9/11 days. we are not at war anymore. we are going back to pre-9/11. we will go try to round up the guys when they blow up. we are no longer on a war footing, if you will, in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that is dead wrong. totalan absolute misreading of where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world am a north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from, but also yemen and the major struggle underway in egypt, the muslim there,hood taken power th
. we knew osama bin laden was in pakistan but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was to go get the intelligence. according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him, because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. why do i tell you all that history? this administration doesn't get it. they just don't and, obama made a speech here not too long ago. it was at the national defense university, maybe three months ago in may, and, basically said, okay, now we're returning back to the pre9/11 days, i.e., we're not at war anymore. we're going back to pre9/11, when it is just a law enforcement problem and we'll try to round up the bad guy when blows something up and we're no longer on a war footing, if you will in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that's dead wrong. i think it is an absolute total misreading where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world, now, north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from but
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)